Jews and the Hungarian State

Integrative and Exclusionary Models from Medieval to Modern Times

  • Nóra Berend
Keywords: ‘Christian national’ state, modern ideas of citizenship, Kingdom of Hungary in the Middle Ages, key moments in modern history, (dis)continuities between medieval exclusion and modern antisemitism

Abstract

In Hungary, official memory and history discourses often distinguish between ‘Jews’ and ‘Hungarians’, harking back to the Horthy-era concept of the ‘Christian national’ state. This dichotomy clashes with modern ideas of citizenship and acts as a carrier of antisemitism. This lecture analyses the role of political authority in fostering integration or exclusion over a long time span. It begins with the attitudes of those holding political power in the Kingdom of Hungary in the Middle Ages, when the distinction between Jews and Christians was based on religious affiliation. In particular, two processes will be examined: one leading to increased integration, granting protection and rights, and the other promoting segregation, demonisation and hostility. The lecture will then focus on key moments in modern history, exploring the functions of these two contradictory but related processes. It will finally tackle the question of the role of the state in (dis)continuities between medieval exclusion and modern antisemitism.

Published
2019-08-06